Chickasaw & Choctaw artist Sue Fish preserving our culture

Chickasaw and Choctaw artist Sue Fish has honed her craft of basket-making for nearly three decades and displayed her art in galleries across the Chickasaw Nation.


An avid member of the First American art scene, Fish is enthusiastic about sharing her passion for preserving Southeastern basketry and reviving river cane basketry. She eagerly demonstrates her techniques while teaching at various community schools and universities, libraries, museums and events.


The artist said she hopes to instill basket appreciation in everyone, both artists and buyers alike.


“I love sharing some of the processes our ancestors may have experienced in basket making. It’s an important way I connect with my culture,” Fish said. “I gather, weave and process natural materials such as pine needle, sweet grass, honeysuckle, buckbrush, and river cane.”

Fish has enjoyed American Indian basket making for nearly 30 years. Some of her work is on display at the Chickasaw Cultural Center, Artesian Art Gallery in Sulphur, the Chickasaw Nation Medical Center in Ada, the Chickasaw Nation Clinic in Ardmore and Exhibit C Native Gallery & Gifts in Oklahoma City. In addition to the Artesian Arts Festival, she participates in the invitational Art of the Chickasaw Women Exhibit and the Southeastern Art Show and Market in Tishomingo.


Fish is a member of the Chickasaw Historical Society. She was selected to be included in the “Chickasaw Renaissance” book and chosen to serve on a panel for the 2010 Dynamic Women of the Chickasaw Nation Conference. Fish is vice president of ONABA (Oklahoma Native American Basket Weaver’s Association) and also a member of the Oklahoma Basket Weaver’s Guild.


About the Artesian Arts Festival


A celebration of all types of art, with an emphasis on First American art and artists, the Artesian Arts Festival features diverse art media and a variety of visual art including paintings, basketry, jewelry, sculpture, metalworking, beadwork, textiles, and pottery.

In 2019, the market saw more than 11,000 attendees and featured 125 elite First American artists from 19 different tribes.


Open to the public at no charge, this family-friendly event features a variety of tribal dance demonstrations, artist talks, children’s activities, food vendors, live music performances and more.


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Cutline: Award-winning Chickasaw and Choctaw artist Sue Fish shares her basket weaving works of art in exhibits across the state


Artist Sue Fish Preserving Indian Culture with Basket-weaving

Cutline: Sue Fish has been basket making for nearly 30 years. Her work is on display at the Chickasaw Cultural Center, Artesian Art Gallery in Sulphur, the Chickasaw Nation Medical Center in Ada, the Chickasaw Nation Clinic in Ardmore and Exhibit C Native Gallery & Gifts in Oklahoma City.



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